Larry Rosenstock

Larry Rosenstock

Larry Rosenstock taught carpentry for eleven years, after law school, in urban high schools in Boston and Cambridge. He served as staff attorney for two years at the Harvard Center for Law and Education, and was a lecturer at the Harvard Graduate School of Education for five years. Larry was principal of the Rindge School of Technical Arts, and of the Cambridge Rindge and Latin School. He directed the federal New Urban High School Project, was president of the Price Charitable Fund, and is the founding principal of High Tech High in San Diego. Larry’s program, “CityWorks,” won the Ford Foundation Innovations in State and Local Government Award in 1992, and he is an Ashoka Fellow.


Vinod Khosla

Vinod Khosla

Vinod Khosla was a co-founder of Daisy Systems and founding Chief Executive Officer of Sun Microsystems where he pioneered open systems and commercial RISC processors. Vinod serves on the boards of Ausra, eASIC, Spatial Photonics, and Xsigo. Sun was funded by Kleiner Perkins and in 1986 Vinod switched sides and joined Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers (KPCB). In 2004, driven by the need for flexibility and a desire to be more experimental, to fund sometimes imprudent “science experiments,” and to take on both “for profit” and for “social impact” ventures, he formed Khosla Ventures. Khosla Ventures focuses on both traditional venture capital technology investments and clean technology ventures. Social ventures include affordable housing, microfinance among others. Vinod holds a Bachelor of Technology in Electrical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology in New Delhi, a Master’s in Biomedical Engineering from Carnegie Mellon.


Andy Bechtolsheim

Andy Bechtolsheim

Andy Bechtolsheim, co-founder of Sun Microsystems, Inc. and employee number one, is Chief Architect and Senior Vice President for the Systems Group, and is also a member of Sun’s executive management team. In this role, Bechtolsheim drives the rapid productization of next generation network server technologies.
Bechtolsheim brings with him over 25 years of Network Computing knowledge and expertise. He was a co-founder of Sun Microsystems where he held a variety of roles including Vice President of Technology and Chief Architect of Sun’s highly successful workstation product line. He invented the “Stanford University Network workstation” that eventually became the Sun-1 Workstation and was instrumental in launching other successful Sun products, including the SparcStation 1.
Bechtolsheim left Sun in 1995 to found Granite Systems, a Gigabit Ethernet start-up company, that was acquired by Cisco Systems in 1996. Andy became Vice President of Engineering and later Vice President General Manager of Cisco’s Gigabit Systems business which developed the Catalyst 4000 family, the industry’s highest volume modular Ethernet switching platform.
Bechtolsheim returned to Sun via the Kealia, Inc. acquisition, a company which he co-founded to develop advanced server technology. Bechtolsheim received a MS in computer engineering from Carnegie Mellon University in 1976 and he was a PhD student in Computer Science and Electrical Engineering at Stanford University from 1977 to 1982. He has been honored with a Fulbright scholarship, a German National Merit Foundation scholarship, the Stanford Entrepreneur Company of the year award, the Smithsonian Leadership Award for Innovation and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.