<meta http-equiv="refresh" content="1; url=/nojavascript/"> HIV ( Study Aids ) | Biology | CK-12 Foundation
Dismiss
Skip Navigation

HIV

%
Best Score
Practice HIV
Practice
Best Score
%
Practice Now
HIV
 0  0  0

HIV

HIV is the virus; AIDS is the resulting disease.

License: CC BY-NC 3.0

Written Response Questions

  1. Where and when did HIV originate?
  2. One day a girl who subconsciously has HIV falls down while running and starts to bleed.  One of her neighbors then rushes outside to the girl to help her clean to cut.  However, her neighbor forgets to put gloves on and comes in direct contact with the girl's blood.  The neighbor finds out in a month that he has contracted the HIV virus. Could he have contracted the virus from helping the girl?  Why or why not?
  3. Can a mother with HIV have children feeling 100% confident that she won't pass the virus onto her offspring?  If not, what kind of treatment can she opt for?
  4. What happens to a person with HIV's CD4 helper T cells?
    1. License: CC BY-NC 3.0

       

  5. Would immuno-suppression (a process that "silences" your immune system and prevents it from functioning) be beneficial to a person with AIDS? Why or why not?  (Note: These questions aren't all straightforward; multiple answers are acceptable as long as you can back them up.)
  6. A person with a severe case of HIV contracts the common cold.  Would they be likely to live? Explain.
  7. How do antiretroviral drugs work?

.


How does HIV infect a CD4 T cell?

Sort the steps of an HIV infection of a helper T cell into the correct order.

Items in red are important vocabulary you should ensure you know.

vDNA goes to the cell nucleus.  The enzyme integrase integrates vDNA into the host cell's genome. In this stage, the vDNA can lie dormant.

The cells most likely to kill HIV, T cells, are now fighting the infection. Virus DNA is transcribed to mRNA which leads to new virus protein and genome production.

The viral particle attaches to CD4 receptor.  The viral envelope fuses with the membrane and the capsid moves into the cell.

Reverse transcriptase  separates single-stranded RNA from viral proteins and copies it onto a complementary strand of DNA. Mutations may occur in this step.

Viral particles assembled inside the cell exit through exocytosis (fusion of vesicle with the membrane). The virus receives its new viral envelope from the cell's plasma membrane.  The cycle continues as these viral particles infect other cells.

The reverse transcriptase then makes a complementary DNA strand to form a double stranded viral DNA, know known as vDNA.

Correct Order:

1) The viral particle attaches to CD4 receptor.  The viral envelope fuses with the membrane and the capsid moves into the cell.

2) Reverse transcriptase  separates single-stranded RNA from viral proteins and copies it onto a complementary strand of DNA. Mutations may occur in this step.

3) The reverse transcriptase then makes a complementary DNA strand to form a double stranded viral DNA, know known as vDNA.

4) vDNA goes to the cell nucleus.  The enzyme integrase integrates vDNA into the host cell's genome. In this stage, the vDNA can lie dormant.

5) The cells most likely to kill HIV, T cells, are now fighting the infection. Virus DNA is transcribed to mRNA which leads to new virus protein and genome production.

6) Viral particles assembled inside the cell exit through exocytosis (fusion of vesicle with the membrane). The virus receives its new viral envelope from the cell's plasma membrane.  The cycle continues as these viral particles infect other cells.

Image Attributions

  1. [1]^ License: CC BY-NC 3.0
  2. [2]^ License: CC BY-NC 3.0

Reviews

Email Verified
Well done! You've successfully verified the email address .
OK
Please wait...
Please wait...

Original text