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Chapter 23: Feynman Diagrams

Difficulty Level: At Grade Created by: CK-12

License: CC BY-NC 3.0

The Big Idea

The interaction of subatomic particles through the four fundamental forces is the basic foundation of all the physics we have studied so far. There’s a relatively simple way to calculate the probability of collisions, annihilations, or decays of particles, invented by physicist Richard Feynman, called Feynman diagrams. Drawing Feynman diagrams is the first step in visualizing and predicting the subatomic world. If a process does not violate a known conservation law, then that process must exist with some probability. All the Standard Model rules of the previous chapter are used here. You are now entering the exciting world of particle physics.

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