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Chapter 3: Finding the Pole Star

Difficulty Level: At Grade Created by: CK-12
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Two bright constellations occupy opposite sides of the pole star --- the Big Dipper and Cassiopeia. As the celestial sphere rotates (or appears to rotate), these constellations also march in circles around the pole . Depending on the hour of the night and the day of the year, one or the other may be low near the horizon where it is barely seen, or even hidden below the horizon. But when that happens the other constellation is sure to be high in the sky, where (weather permitting) it is easily seen.

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Difficulty Level:
At Grade
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Date Created:
Feb 27, 2012
Last Modified:
May 08, 2015
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