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Everyday Stoichiometry

The quantitative relationship between reactants and products in a chemical reaction

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Everyday Stoichiometry

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Everyday Stoichiometry

License: CC BY-NC 3.0

[Figure1]

Stoichiometry is how a chemist is able to keep track of the chemicals being used in a reaction.  This enables them to be able to know how much of each chemical is being consumed, how much is needed, and what the limiting reagent is.

An example: If a hypothetical salad was to be made of:
1 bag of lettuce(L), 4 carrots(C), 1 cup almonds(A), 3 tomatoes(T), and 2 avocado (Av).
Then this would be the equation for this salad:

L \begin{align*}+\end{align*} 4C \begin{align*}+\end{align*} A \begin{align*}+\end{align*} 3T \begin{align*}+\end{align*} 2Av \begin{align*}\rightarrow\end{align*} LC4AT3Av2.

That is the equation only for one (large) salad. However, you are making salad for your school reunion and need 3 of these (large) salads. How many bags of lettuce, and how many carrots will you need? What conversion factors will you use? Lastly, is 5 tomatoes enough?

For the explanation of how to go about the questions and a better understanding of everyday stoichiometry, click here.

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