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Comparing Angles and Sides in Triangles

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The Secret of the Kitchen Triangle

Credit: Brad Holt
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/brad_holt/3478512998/
License: CC BY-NC 3.0

Triangles are everywhere. In fact, in most American homes, there’s a triangle in the kitchen. Since World War II, American builders have used the “kitchen triangle” to conserve costs and make cooking convenient.

Three Points and Room to Move

The kitchen triangle focus on three main points: the stove top, the sink, and the refrigerator. These appliances form the vertices of the kitchen triangle. Designers say that each side of the triangle should be between 4 feet and 9 feet long. The sum of all the sides must be less than 26 feet. These distances give the cook room to move. They’re short enough so that the cook doesn't get tired.

Credit: Dennis Wong
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/denniswong/5271324737/
License: CC BY-NC 3.0

Restaurant kitchens are not built around triangles. That’s because in a restaurant, many people cook at one time. The kitchen triangle is designed for one person and so is more appropriate for homes. Until recently, the kitchen triangle was the most popular design for home kitchens. Today, some people prefer a kitchen with stations, which make the kitchen more like a restaurant kitchen. It's ideal for a family that likes to cooks together. A good designer can alter a design to fit the unique needs of each client.

See for yourself: http://www.hgtvremodels.com/video/quick-tips-the-work-triangle-video/index.html

Explore More

Read the article below on the future of the kitchen triangle in modern homes.

http://www.cultivate.com/articles/kitchen-triangle-dead-0?pagenumber=1

What are the benefits of a kitchen triangle? When is another design better?

Image Attributions

  1. [1]^ Credit: Brad Holt; Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/brad_holt/3478512998/; License: CC BY-NC 3.0
  2. [2]^ Credit: Dennis Wong; Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/denniswong/5271324737/; License: CC BY-NC 3.0

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