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Melting

Introduction to process in which rocks or other solids change to liquids.

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You Make My Heart Melt

What are some uses of melting?

The water molecules’ bonds in ice are stronger in a solid state than in a liquid state. As the ice heats up, the molecules begin to move around until the molecules are forced to break apart. This is the process of melting.

Credit: jo-h
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jo-h/6200225665/in/photolist-arTM5v-dZrrYw-ckhLKW-b9osN4-d4xDSC/lightbox/
License: CC BY-NC 3.0

Melting ice cream cones [Figure1]

It’s certain that you have experienced a plethora of scorching hot days on which you lingered outside with your popsicle or ice cream cone only to have it melt within a matter of minutes.

On snowy winter days, why do people sprinkle salt on snow in the streets in an attempt to melt it? Salt, a catalyst in this situation, lowers the melting point of the snow and causes it to convert to water.

Creative Applications

  1. What are ice melters and how do they work?
  2. How does melting exhibit the molecular properties of solids and liquids in general?
  3. Why does ice melt on the surface first?

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