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Newton's Second Law

Levels are CK-12's student achievement levels.
Basic Students matched to this level have a partial mastery of prerequisite knowledge and skills fundamental for proficient work.
At Grade (Proficient) Students matched to this level have demonstrated competency over challenging subject matter, including subject matter knowledge, application of such knowledge to real-world situations, and analytical skills appropriate to subject matter.
Advanced Students matched to this level are ready for material that requires superior performance and mastery.
  • Read
    Newton's Second Law

    Newton's Second Law

    by Jeffery Feathers //at grade

    The acceleration experienced by an object will be proportional to the applied force and inversely proportional to its mass. If there are multiple forces, they can be added as vectors and it is the net force that matters.

  • Read
    Newton's Second Law-Grade 7 Physical Science

    Newton's Second Law-Grade 7 Physical Science

    by Allison Griner //at grade

    Newton's second law of motion and the effects of force and mass on acceleration. Direct and inverse relationships between force, mass and acceleration.

  • Read
    Newton's Second Law

    Newton's Second Law

    by Capi Marceau //at grade

    Newton's second law of motion and the effects of force and mass on acceleration. Direct and inverse relationships between force, mass and acceleration.

  • Read
    Newton's Second Law

    Newton's Second Law

    by Ed Ott //at grade

    The acceleration experienced by an object will be proportional to the applied force and inversely proportional to its mass. If there are multiple forces, they can be added as vectors and it is the net force that matters.

  • Read
    Newton's Second Law

    Newton's Second Law

    by Michael O'Shaughnessy //at grade

    The acceleration experienced by an object will be proportional to the applied force and inversely proportional to its mass. If there are multiple forces, they can be added as vectors and it is the net force that matters.

  • Real World Application
    A Big Kick, But Big Enough?

    A Big Kick, But Big Enough?

    by Vinay Satish //at grade

    How is the acceleration of a soccer ball dependent on its mass and kick force?

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