<meta http-equiv="refresh" content="1; url=/nojavascript/"> Multiple Bar Graphs ( Read ) | Statistics | CK-12 Foundation
Dismiss
Skip Navigation
You are viewing an older version of this Concept. Go to the latest version.

Multiple Bar Graphs

%
Best Score
Practice Multiple Bar Graphs
Practice
Best Score
%
Practice Now
Multiple Bar Graphs
 0  0  0 Share To Groups

Have you ever visited a farm stand? Tania and Alex went to visit one. Here is what they found.

Tania and Alex met with Frank of "Frank's Farm Stand" to ask him about his produce. Frank said that his employees have to keep track of their sales all the time. Here is what was recorded.

Frank’s Farm Stand kept track of the number of pounds of vegetables sold over a three-day period. The results are listed on the table below.

Type of Vegetable: Pounds Sold: Day One Pounds Sold: Day Two Pounds Sold: Day Three
Squash 32 lbs. 36 lbs. 36 lbs.
Zucchini 40 lbs. 33 lbs. 37 lbs.
Corn 56 lbs. 65 lbs. 67 lbs.
Carrots 28 lbs. 25 lbs. 23 lbs.
Romaine Lettuce 27 lbs. 31 lbs. 34 lbs.
Tomatoes 44 lbs. 54 lbs. 58 lbs.

Tania made a note of all of the information from the farm stand. She decided to create a multiple bar graph to show the data.

How can she do this?

This Concept is all about multiple bar graphs. When you are finished, you will understand how Tania could accomplish her task.

Guidance

We previously worked on how to make a double bar graph. Let's look at a double bar graph on ice cream sales.

We can look at this bar graph and compare the ice cream sales during the months of July and August.

What if we wanted to compare ice cream sales during September and October with the sales from July and August?

This is a situation where we would need to make a second double bar graph. We need to use the same scale so that we can visually examine both sets of data. We can use the same steps as before.

Here is the data on ice cream sales during September and October for weeks 1 – 4.

September October
Week 1 600 400
Week 2 500 200
Week 3 400 100
Week 4 300 100

Now we can take this data and design a double bar graph.

Now we can work on drawing conclusions by comparing the two double bar graphs. Answer these questions.

Example A

Which week in the month of September had the best sales?

Solution: Week One

Example B

What conclusion can you draw about ice cream sales during the month of October?

Solution: Ice cream sales in the month of October decreased steadily.

Example C

Did week 2 in September or week 2 in July have better sales?

Solution: Week 2 in July

Remember the farm stand? Here is the original problem once again.

Tania and Alex met with Frank of "Frank's Farm Stand" to ask him about his produce. Frank said that his employees have to keep track of their sales all the time. Here is what was recorded.

Frank’s Farm Stand kept track of the number of pounds of vegetables sold over a three-day period. The results are listed on the table below.

Type of Vegetable: Pounds Sold: Day One Pounds Sold: Day Two Pounds Sold: Day Three
Squash 32 lbs. 36 lbs. 36 lbs.
Zucchini 40 lbs. 33 lbs. 37 lbs.
Corn 56 lbs. 65 lbs. 67 lbs.
Carrots 28 lbs. 25 lbs. 23 lbs.
Romaine Lettuce 27 lbs. 31 lbs. 34 lbs.
Tomatoes 44 lbs. 54 lbs. 58 lbs.

Tania made a note of all of the information from the farm stand. She decided to create a multiple bar graph to show the data.

How can she do this?

To accomplish this task, Tania has to follow all of the steps necessary for creating a multiple bar graph.

To create a multiple bar graph:

  1. Draw the horizontal (x) and vertical (y) axis.
  2. Give the graph the title “Frank’s Farm Stand.”
  3. Label the horizontal axis “Vegetables.”
  4. Label the vertical axis “Pounds Sold.”
  5. Look at the range in data and decide how the units on the vertical axis (y) should be labeled. In this case, label the vertical axis 0 - 80 by tens.
  6. For each vegetable on the horizontal (x) axis, draw a vertical column to the appropriate value three times, one column representing day one, a second column for day two, and a third column for day three.
  7. Choose three colors, one to represent the values for day one, one for the values for day two, and finally one to represent the values for day three.

Here is the final result.

Vocabulary

Bar graph
A way to organize data using bars and two axes. One axis represents the number of each item and the other axis represents the item that was counted.
Multiple Bar Graph
A graph that has multiple bars for each item counted. It still uses a scale, but is designed to compare the data collected during multiple times or events. A multiple bar graph is a tool for comparisons.

Guided Practice

Here is one for you to try on your own.

Look at this bar graph once again.

November's ice cream sales were half of the October sales for Week's 1, 2, 3 and 4.

Given this information, what were the sales for each of these weeks?

Answer

To figure this out, we will need to read the bar graph.

Here are the October sales.

Week 1 = 400

Week 2 = 200

Week 3 = 100

Week 4 = 100

Which means the sales for November were the following:

Week 1 = 200

Week 2 = 100

Week 3 = 50

Week 4 = 50

Video Review

Khan Academy Reading Bar Graphs

Practice

Directions: Here is the bar graph from the Concept. Use it to answer the following questions.

1. Which day had the greatest pounds of carrots sold?

2. Which vegetable was the most popular over all?

3. Which vegetable was the least popular over all?

4. Which vegetable had the smallest difference between the number of pounds sold per day?

5. Which vegetable was the most popular on day one?

6. Which vegetable was the most popular on day two?

7. Which vegetable was the most popular on day three?

8. About how many pounds of zucchini were sold on day two?

9. About how many pounds of tomatoes were sold on day one?

10. About how many pounds of carrots were sold on day three?

11. About how many pounds of squash was sold on day one?

12. How many total pounds of squash was sold on days 1, 2 and 3?

13. How many total pounds of zucchini was sold on days 1, 2 and 3?

14. How many total pounds of carrots was sold on days 1, 2, and 3?

15. How many total pounds of lettuce was sold on day 3?

Image Attributions

Reviews

Email Verified
Well done! You've successfully verified the email address .
OK
Please wait...
Please wait...
ShareThis Copy and Paste

Original text