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12.14: More Practice with Prefixes, Suffixes, and Bound Bases

Difficulty Level: At Grade Created by: CK-12
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More Practice with Prefixes, Suffixes, and Bound Bases

1. Show any assimilations and other changes as you analyze each of the following words. All of the words in each group contain the same bound base:

Word = Prefix + Bound Base + Suffix
referent = re + fer + ent
conferred = co\begin{align*}\cancel{m}\end{align*} + n + fer + r + ed
transferring = trans + fer + r + ing
preference = pre + fer + ence
affection = a\begin{align*}\cancel{d}\end{align*} + f + fect + ion
confection = co\begin{align*}\cancel{m}\end{align*} + n + fect + ion
defective = de + fect + ive
infected = in + fect + ed
perfectly = per + fect + ly
concepts = co\begin{align*}\cancel{m}\end{align*} + n + cept + s
acceptance = a\begin{align*}\cancel{d}\end{align*} + c + cept + ance
deceptive = de + cept + ive
excepting = ex + cept + ing
inception = in + cept + ed
intercepted = inter + cept + ed
perceptive = per + cept + ive
reception = re + cept + ion

2. Analyze each of the following words into the elements as indicated in the Formula column. In the Formula column “P” means “Prefix,” “BB” means “Bound Base,” and “S” means “Suffix.” Be sure to show any assimilations. You have worked with all of the bound bases and most of the prefixes and suffixes. We have helped you with some tricky ones:

Word Formula Analysis
disinfectants P + P + BB + S + S dis + in + fect + ant + s
circumspectly P + BB + S circum + spect + ly
receptacles P + BB + S + S re + cept + acle + s
susceptible P + BB + S su\begin{align*}\cancel{b}\end{align*} + s + cept + ible
unsuspectingly P + P + BB + S + S un + su\begin{align*}\cancel{b}\end{align*} + s + spect + ing + ly
disrespectfully P + P + BB + S + S dis + re + spect + ful + ly
spectacularly BB + S + S spect + acular + ly
unaffectionate P + P + BB + S + S un + a\begin{align*}\cancel{b}\end{align*} + f + fect + ion + ate
decongestant P + P + BB + S de + co\begin{align*}\cancel{m}\end{align*} + n + gest + ant
gestures BB + S + S gest + ure + s
indigestible P + P + BB + S in + di\begin{align*}\cancel{s}\end{align*} + gest + ible
preconceptions P + P + BB + S + S pre + co\begin{align*}\cancel{m}\end{align*} + n + cept + ion + s
imperfectly P + P + BB + S i\begin{align*}\cancel{n}\end{align*} + m + per + fect + ly
spectacles BB + S + S spect + acle + s
synonymous P + BB + S syn + onym + ous

3. Try some the other way around. Combine the elements into words. Watch for assimilations:

Elements = Word
in + e\begin{align*}\cancel{x}\end{align*} + f + fect + ive + ly = ineffectively
re + spect + abil + ity = respectability
i\begin{align*}\cancel{n}\end{align*} + m + per + cept + ible = imperceptible
co\begin{align*}\cancel{m}\end{align*} + n + gest + ed = congested
pro + spect + ing = prospecting
re + in + fect + ed = reinfected
re + cept + ion + ist + s = receptionists
un + a\begin{align*}\cancel{d}\end{align*} + c + cept + able = unacceptable
sy\begin{align*}\cancel{n}\end{align*} + stem + atic = systematic

Word Histories. Here are two words that – surprisingly enough –originally contained the prefix dis-: dine and dinner.

The word dine comes from the Old French word disner, which came from the Latin word disj\begin{align*}\bar{\mathrm{e}}\end{align*}j\begin{align*}\bar{\mathrm{u}}\end{align*}n\begin{align*}\bar{\mathrm{a}}\end{align*}re, which meant “to break one's fast.” (In French breakfast is called petit dejeuner.) The dis- prefix is clear in the French and Latin words but it is so well hidden in the modern English spelling and pronunciation that we treat dine as a free base, with no prefix.. The word dinner is related to dine.

Teaching Notes.

Word Histories. The stem j\begin{align*}\bar{\mathrm{e}}\end{align*}j\begin{align*}\bar{\mathrm{u}}\end{align*}n\begin{align*}\bar{\mathrm{a}}\end{align*}re in the Latin disj\begin{align*}\bar{\mathrm{e}}\end{align*}j\begin{align*}\bar{\mathrm{a}}\end{align*}re meant “to fast, to be empty.” It also is the source of our word jejune “dull, insipid, empty.”

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