<meta http-equiv="refresh" content="1; url=/nojavascript/"> Lesson Nineteen | CK-12 Foundation
Dismiss
Skip Navigation
You are reading an older version of this FlexBook® textbook: Basic Speller Teacher Materials Go to the latest version.

3.19: Lesson Nineteen

Created by: CK-12

Silent Final <e> in VCV

1. Here is a review of long and short vowels:

Short Vowels Long Vowels
[a] as in mad [\bar{\mathrm{a}}] as in made
[\mathrm{e}] as in met [\bar{\mathrm{e}}] as in meet
[i] as in hid [\bar{\mathrm{I}}] as in hide
[o] as in hop [\bar{\mathrm{O}}] as in hope
[\mathrm{u}] as in cut [\bar{\mathrm{o o}}] as in coot
[\breve{\mathrm{o o}}] as in cook [\mathrm{y} \bar{\mathrm{o o}}] as in cute

2. Mark the first vowel in each word <v>. Then mark the next two letters either <v> or <c>. If you get to the end of the word before you mark all three letters, use the tic-tac-toe sign to mark the end of the word:

& \text{hop} &&\text{big} && \text{hid} && \text{mad}  \\& \text{cvc}\# && \text{cvc}\# && \text{cvc}\# && \text{cvc}\# \\& \text{hope} && \text{use} && \text{hide} && \text{made}  \\& \quad \text{vcv} && \quad \text{vcv} && \quad \text{vcv} && \quad \text{vcv} \\& \text{cube} && \text{stripe} && \text{ate} && \text{ride} \\& \quad \text{vcv} && \quad \text{vcv} && \quad \text{vcv} && \quad \text{vcv} \\& \text{cub} && \text{strip} && \text{has} && \text{rid} \\& \text{cvc}\# && \text{cvc}\# && \text{cvc}\# && \text{cvc}\# \\& \text{name} && \text{cap} && \text{life} && \text{when} \\& \quad \text{vcv} && \quad \text{vcv} && \quad \text{vcv} && \quad \text{vcv} \\& \text{crab} && \text{home} && \text{thin} && \text{scene} \\& \quad \text{cvc}\# && \quad \text{vcv} && \quad \text{cvc}\# && \quad \text{vcv}

In words that end VC# mark the letter in front of the <v> either <v> or <c>;.

3. Sort the words into this matrix:

Words with the end
CVC# VCV
Words with long vowels 1

hope

ate

cube

life

name

made

use

ride

stripe

scene

home

hide

2

Words with short vowels

3

hop

hid

cub

has

crap

thin

big

mad

strip

rid

cap

when

4

4. In the CVC# pattern is the vowel long or is it short? short

5. In the VCV pattern is the first vowel long or is it short? long

6. All the words in square #2 in the matrix have a silent final <e> and long vowel sound.

In each of these words the final <e> is the second vowel in the VCV pattern.

Very often a final <e> is the second vowel in a VCV pattern and shows that the first vowel is long.

7. In words like made the final <e> shows that the vowel in front of it is long.

Word Venn. The following puzzle is called a Word Venn because it uses circles to help us sort things out in a way that was developed by an Englishman named John Venn. The Word Venn below defines two groups of words: those that go insidethe circle and those that go outside the circle (but inside the rectangle). Write thewords into the Word Venn according to the following instructions:

Inside circle A put only words that end with a silent final <e> that marks a long vowel.

Outside the circle (but inside the rectangle) put only words that end with a silent final <e> that does not mark a long vowel.

& \text{bottle} \surd && \text{make} \surd && \text{cube} \surd && \text{house} \surd \\& \text{scene} \surd && \text{single} \surd && \text{life} \surd && \text{prize} \surd \\& \text{hide} \surd && \text{ice} \surd && \text{once} \surd && \text{those} \surd

Teaching Notes.

In future lessons the students will learn that silent final <e> has a number of different functions. But its most important one is marking long vowels in VCV strings.

Word Venn. Word Venns provide a sorting strategy rather like that done in tables andmatrixes. But Venns allow sorts with more dimensions than do one-dimensional tables or two-dimensional matrixes. One-dimensional Venns, with only one circle, like that inthis lesson, define only two groups: those words that go inside the circle vs. those thatgo outside it. Two-dimensional Venns, with two intersecting circles define four groups: (i) words that go inside the first circle but not inside the second, (ii) words that go insidethe second circle but not inside the first, (iii) words that go inside both circles, and (iv)words that do not go inside either circle. For an example of a two-dimensional Venn,see Lesson 21. Three-dimensional Venns, with three intersecting circles define eightdifferent groups (see Lesson 39). You can actually have four- and five-dimensional Venns, though things get quite complex when you try to keep track of so many different groups. (A four-dimensional Venn, with four intersecting circles, defines fourteen distinct groups)

Word Venns are based on the logic of the Venn diagrams used in mathematics, with which your students may already be working. Future lessons will present a series ofincreasingly complex Venns with lists of current words that students sort into thediagrams. Like the work with tables and matrixes, work with Venns serves the following purposes: 1. It gives the students another chance to work with the current words, towork with them in a way that involves some kind of analysis (determined by the features that are being used to define the Venn groups) as well as simply copying the words. 2.It reinforces the concepts represented by the features defining the Venn groups and their relationships. 3. It gives the students practice with another tool of inductivereasoning: for observing, analysing, and displaying results.

Image Attributions

Description

Authors:

Grades:

1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5

Date Created:

Feb 23, 2012

Last Modified:

Apr 29, 2014
You can only attach files to None which belong to you
If you would like to associate files with this None, please make a copy first.

Reviews

Please wait...
Please wait...
Image Detail
Sizes: Medium | Original
 
CK.ENG.ENG.TE.1.Basic-Speller.3.19

Original text