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Activity 9-1: Risk Taking and Sexual Coercion

PLAN

Summary In this activity students apply the STD model of risk taking to sexual coercion. Students recognize no-risk, low-risk, and high-risk behaviors, knowledge that could prevent them from becoming victims of sexual coercion.

Objectives

Students:

\checkmark identify high-risk behavior.

\checkmark identify steps to minimize coercion.

Student Materials

  • Activity Report

Teacher Materials

  • Activity Report Answer Key

Estimated Time 40 minutes

Interdisciplinary Connections

This activity has connections to Guidance. It can be extended to include Social Studies Have students watch their normal television programs and watch for risk-taking behavior in which a person did or did not become a victim of sexual coercion. Students should report their findings back to the class using specific examples from the programs. The daily news and movies can also be used to find examples.

Language Arts Have students write short scripts in which the characters are placed in various degrees of risk taking. The scripts can then be read or acted out in front of the class. At some point in the performance the class can be asked to identify the degree of risk taking the characters are involved in. Then they can give their prediction of what is likely to happen. The performance can continue to its conclusion. It is always interesting to include some surprise endings.

IMPLEMENT

Introduce Activity 9-1 by going over the introduction in the student text.

Step 1 Divide the class into three smaller groups and give each group an Activity Report.

Steps 2-3 Students are to list those factors that would involve virtually no risk, low risk, or high risk of becoming a victim of sexual coercion. Groups will respond to the questions and then report their conclusions to the class.

Conclude Activity 9-1 by asking selected students to draw Venn diagrams on the board and fill them in according to the conclusions of their groups.

ASSESS

Use the responses on the Activity Report, class discussion, and the Venn diagrams (if used) to assess if students can

\checkmark identify no-risk behavior.

\checkmark identify low-risk behavior.

\checkmark identify high-risk behavior.

Activity 9-1: Risk Taking and Sexual Coercion – Activity Report Answer Key

  • Sample answers to these questions will be provided upon request. Please send an email to teachers-requests@ck12.org to request sample answers.

These points could be mentioned in their conclusions:

Respond to each of the questions asked and report the group's conclusions to the class.

  1. What are some examples of activities you could engage in with acquaintances, friends, or dates that would put you at “low risk” or “high risk” for sexual coercion? (Low-risk and high-risk behaviors should be included.)
  2. Sexual coercion involves an aggressor and a victim. Although the victims are primarily females, this is not always true. How can you ensure that you, personally, will decrease your chances of becoming a victim of sexual coercion, either physically or psychologically?
  3. Sometimes it is not clear who is the aggressor and who is the victim. What kind of behavior would put you at “low risk”or at “high risk” of being misunderstood by your partner?
  4. How can you use communication with your partner to minimize the risks of sexual coercion? What kinds of attitudes help?

Write a letter to the editor of your school newspaper about risk taking. What kinds of risks should youth take? What kinds shouldn't they take?

Activity 9-2: Sexuality in the Lives of Four Couples

PLAN

Summary Students begin to put sexuality in its proper perspective. They consider the sexuality of a specific age group group met try to determine what part sexuality plays in the relationship of that couple.

Objective

Students:

\checkmark recognize that sexuality is an impottant part in the life of a couple but it is only one part of that relationship.

Student Materials

  • Activity Report

Teacher Materials

  • Activity Report Answer Key

Advance Preparation

Prepare one Activity Report for each group of 4-5 students. Check off one space on each report to indicate the age you want that group to consider.

Estimated Time 40 minutes

Interdisciplinary Connections

This activity has connections to Advisory, Language Arts, and Social Science.

Prerequisites and Background Information

Define the following functions as they relate to sexuality, so that students will have a working knowledge of them: (suggested definitions)

  • biological (sex drive, reproduction)
  • psychological (mental, in the mind)
  • social (companionship)
  • moral (right and wrong)

IMPLEMENT

Introduce Activity 9-2 by asking students if they think an interest in sex suddenly stops at any particular age. Read the introduction to the activity from their textbook.

Step 1 Divide the class into small groups of about 4-5 students each. Give each group the Activity Report and tell students to see which spaces were checked so they will know their assigned age group.

Step 2 Usually adolescents have no clue about how old an adult might be. If one has gray hair they just assume that person knew Abraham Lincoln in person! Therefore, there could be some humorous comments made about couples in their 50s and 70s having sexuality in their lives.

Extend this activity by doing the following.

  • Encourage students to do volunteer work at adult day healthcare centers, retirement communities, etc., to see older adults enjoying their relationships. Students can keep a journal of their observations and report back to the class.
  • Show the movie, Cocoon, that shows humorously and poignantly the relationships of older people.
  • Invite couples who have healthy relationships to the class to talk to the students about what each does to make a relationship work.
  • Interview single, older people to find out how they maintain their social lives.

Conclude Activity 9-2 by having the groups report their conclusions starting with the youngest couple. Students will learn about the changes in sexuality as each couple matures.

ASSESS

Use the responses on the Activity Report and the student presentations to assess if students can

\checkmark explain how sexuality changes as couples mature.

\checkmark determine that sexuality is but one part of a lifelong meaningful relationship.

Activity Report 9-2: Sexuality in the Lives of Four Couples – Activity Report Answer Key

Group # ____________ Age group: __ 15, __ 25, __ 50, __ 75

Instructions

Based on the age category of your couple, respond to each of the questions as completely as you can. Your conclusions will be shared with the class.

  1. What is their relationship likely to be (dating, friends, single, married, divorced, etc.)?
  2. Should sex be part of their relationship at this age? Explain.
  3. In what ways is their sexual experience likely to be the same and in what ways different from other times in their lives? Explain.
  4. What biological functions does sex serve in the life of the couple? Explain.
  5. What psychological function does sex fulfill in the life of the couple? Explain.
  6. What social function does sex fulfill in the life of the couple? Explain.
  7. What moral considerations enter into the sexual experiences of the couple? Explain.
  8. What is the couple's relationship centered around at this age besides sex?

How would you assess your risk taking behavior? Are there some things you do take risks for and others not? How would others assess your risk-taking profile?

Role Models Students think about who their role models are and what they tell them about assorted topics. They write a paragraph about one of the role models and what they have to say about sexual behavior, sexuality, risk, morality, and friends/peers.

Review Questions/Answers

  • Sample answers to these questions will be provided upon request. Please send an email to teachers-requests@ck12.org to request sample answers.
  1. What questions might you ask yourself when assessing the potential risk of a behavior?
  2. To what two general concepts does the term safer sex refer?
  3. Name three ways in which drugs and alcohol affect sexual health.
  4. What five factors make adolescents particularly vulnerable to high-risk behavior and its consequences?
  5. Identify and draw the possible stages in a person's sexual life. What is the purpose and meaning of sexual behavior in the various stages of life?
    1. Childhood
    2. Adolescence
    3. Young Adulthood
    4. Mid-life
    5. Older Years

Activity 9-1 Report: Risk Taking and Sexual Coercion (Student Reproducible)

Respond to each of the questions asked and report the group's conclusions to the class.

1. What are some examples of activities you could engage in with acquaintances, friends, or dates that would put you at “low risk” or “high risk” for sexual coercion?

2. Sexual coercion involves an aggressor and a victim. Although the victims are primarily females, this is not always true. How can you ensure that you, personally, will decrease your chances of becoming a victim of sexual coercion, either physically or psychologically?

3. Sometimes it is not clear who is the aggressor and who is the victim. What kind of behavior would put you at “low risk” or at “high risk” of being misunderstood by your partner?

4. How can you use communication with your partner to minimize the risks of sexual coercion? What kinds of attitudes help?

Activity 9-1 Report: Sexuality in the Lives of Four Couples (Student Reproducible)

Group # ____________ Age group:___ 15, ___ 25, ___ 50, ___ 75

Instructions

Based on the age category of your couple, respond to each of the questions as completely as you can. Your conclusions will be shared with the class.

1. What is their relationship likely to be (dating, friends, single, married, divorced, etc.)?

2. Should sex be part of their relationship at this age? Explain.

3. In what ways is their sexual experience likely to be the same and in what ways different from other times in their lives? Explain.

4. What biological functions does sex serve in the life of the couple? Explain.

5. What psychological function does sex fulfill in the life of the couple? Explain.

6. What social function does sex fulfill in the life of the couple? Explain.

7. What moral considerations enter into the sexual experiences of the couple? Explain.

8. What is the couple's relationship centered around at this age besides sex?

Image Attributions

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Authors:

Grades:

6 , 7 , 8

Date Created:

Feb 23, 2012

Last Modified:

Sep 02, 2014
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