<meta http-equiv="refresh" content="1; url=/nojavascript/"> Using GroupWork Activities | CK-12 Foundation
Dismiss
Skip Navigation

These GroupWork activities are the same for the three units HumBio that fall under the heading Adolescent Topics. These three units are titled Your Changing Body, Sexuality, and Reproduction. If you choose to do all three units, we suggest you implement the GroupWork activities after you bare completed the last of the three units. If you choose to do only one of the units, such as this one, we suggest you do the GroupWork activities after you have completed this unit. It is not necessary to do all of these units. However, if you choose to do all three units, it is not necessary to do them in any specific order.

Learning science is a process that is both individual and social. Like researchers, engineers, mathematicians or physicians who work in teams to answer questions and to solve problems, students in science classrooms often need to interact with their peers to develop deeper knowledge of scientific concepts and ideas. The GroupWork activities were developed to foster an environment in which groups of students work cooperatively to:

  • plan experiments,
  • collect and review data,
  • ask questions and offer solutions,
  • use data to explain and justify their arguments,
  • discuss ideas and negotiate conflicting interpretations,
  • summarize and present findings,
  • and explore the societal implications of the scientific enterprise.

The GroupWork environment is one in which students are “doing science” as a team. Suggestions about when to introduce these group activities are included in the Teacher Activity Notes.

Format and Organization of GroupWork Activities

Each GroupWork activity includes teacher activity notes, an activity guide, an individual report, resource materials, and at times, data sheets. The activity guide contains instructions for the group's task and questions to be discussed as students plan for and work on a group product. Resource materials are varied. They might include textual information, visual resources such as photos, drawings, graphs or diagrams, video, or audiotapes. Individual reports by students are an integral part of each activity to be completed in class or as part of a homework assignment. Planning information for the teacher is found on the Teacher Activity Notes page.

Sets of GroupWork activities are organized around a central concept or a basic scientific question-a “big idea.” Ideally, as students rotate to complete these activities, they encounter this central idea, question, or concept in different scientific contexts or in different social settings. These rotations provide students with multiple opportunities to grapple with the material, explore related questions and dilemmas, look at different representations, and think of different applications. Figure 1 shows how students rotate from activity to activity around the “big idea.”

The GroupWork activities were designed to be open-ended to foster the development of higher-order thinking skills. Such open-endedness allows students to decide as a group how to go about completing the task, as well as what the final group product might be. Open-ended group activities increase the need for interaction as students serve as resources for one another, draw upon each other's expertise and knowledge, and take advantage of their different problem-solving strategies. When groups are heterogeneous and include students with many different intellectual abilities, the repertoire of strategies and previous experiences is rich and diverse. As students interact with their peers, they learn how to communicate effectively, justify their arguments when challenged, and examine scientific problems from different perspectives. Such interaction scaffolds students' knowledge of scientific concepts and principles.

These GroupWork activities then are quite different from traditional lab activities that include more step-by-step procedures and are crowded with details. In addition to reading, writing, and computing (the traditional academic abilities), students use many different intellectual abilities to complete their task. They make observations, pose questions, plan investigations; they use and create visual models, access and interpret scientific information from different sources and from different media, and convey scientific findings in diagrams, graphs, charts, or tables. The use of a wide array of resource materials provides students with additional ways to access and use information, as well as with additional opportunities to demonstrate their intellectual competence and be recognized for their contributions. We have included in the Teacher Activity Notes a partial list of some of the multiple abilities students might be observed using in these group activities.

When group activities are open-ended, rich, and intellectually demanding, a single student will not be able to complete the task in a timely fashion by himself or herself. Making students responsible as a group to interpret a challenging task and to design a common product or group presentation increases group interdependence. Teachers know, however, that it is also important to hold each student personally accountable for contributing to the group's success and for mastering the concepts or the big idea of the activity. To do so, students are required to complete individual written reports in which they respond in their own words to key discussion questions and summarize what they have learned in the group activity. These written responses can be useful for teachers in gauging and monitoring student understanding and progress.

Role of the Teacher Planning ahead and organizing the classroom for GroupWork is important for the successful implementation of group activities. We suggest that you refer to Elizabeth Cohen's book, Designing GroupWork: Strategies for Heterogeneous Classrooms, published by Teachers College Press in 1994. (See also Lotan, R.A., J.A. Bianchini, and N. C. Holthuis (1996). “Complex Instruction in the Science Classroom: The Human Biology Curriculum in Action,” in R. J. Stahl, (Ed.) Cooperative Learning in Science. A Handbook for Teachers, Addison-Wesley Publishing Company)

Many teachers have realized that when students work in groups, direct instruction is no longer practical. The teacher can't be everywhere at once, telling students exactly what to do and how to do it. Thus, teachers delegate authority to students and students take responsibility for their own behavior and their own learning. Rather than constantly turning to the teacher for help, students talk with each other to find out what they should be doing and to solve the challenging problems assigned to them. Teaching students to work collaboratively and to be responsible to one another as a group is an important prerequisite for successful GroupWork. Students also support the smooth operation of groups when they have learned to play different roles in their groups effectively. For example, the facilitator sees to it that everyone in the group knows what has to be done and gets help when necessary. The recorder keeps notes of the group's discussions and checks to see if individual reports have been completed. The materials manager sees to it that the group has all the equipment necessary and that the tables are cleared at the end of the lesson. The reporter presents the findings of the group during wrap-up time. When the activity involves hazardous materials, a safety officer might be needed. Every student must have a role to play, and roles rotate so students learn how to perform each role competently.

Delegating authority doesn't mean that the teacher Withdraws from the class or completely stays out of the action. Instead of being the focal point of the classroom, the teacher carefully observes the students as they work in the groups, stimulates and extends their thinking, and provides specific feedback.

Equalizing Participation among Members of the Group Making sure that all members of the group have access to the materials and that one group member doesn't take over or dominate the group while another withdraws are among the principal challenges of GroupWork. Teachers can increase participation of students by explaining how the different intellectual abilities are relevant to the successful completion of the task. The teacher states that while no one group member has all the abilities, everyone in the group has some of the intellectual abilities necessary to complete the task successfully. Furthermore, after careful observation of the students' work in groups, the teacher can publicly acknowledge those students who have made relevant contributions and explain specifically how these contributions made the group move forward and become more successful. It is important that the teacher be able to notice the intellectual contributions of students who have low academic or peer status, and who are frequently left out of group interactions. These strategies are particularly relevant in untracked classrooms, where students have a wide range of previous academic achievement (mainly in reading) or where significant proportions of students are English-language learners. Teachers, classmates, and the low-status students themselves need to understand that when many different intellectual abilities are necessary to complete a task successfully, everybody's contribution becomes critical to the success of the group. As more previously low-achieving students feel and are expected to be competent, their participation in the group increases, and subsequently their learning achievements increase as well.

Rachel A Lotan, Ph.D.

School of Education

Stanford University

Figure 1 Activity Rotation in GroupWork

GroupWork Contents

Activity Duration Materials Activity Summary
1. Orientation Activity: 30 minutes None required Students analyze decisions made by teenagers in popular TV shows about sexually related issues.
2. Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs): Myths or Facts? 50 minutes Art supplies, props, and costumes Students learn about STDs by identifying and distinguishing the facts about STDs from commonly held beliefs about STDs.
3. To Wait or Not to Wait? 50 minutes Art supplies, props, and costumes Students learn about the pros and abstaining from sexual intercourse by analyzing quotes and statistics that show contradictions between what teenagers say and what they do.
4. Body Image-What Is Attractive? 50 minutes Art supplies, props, and costumes Students learn about society's varying perceptions of body image by examining magazines and medical charts. They can then determine their personal definition of attractiveness.
5. Who's Responsible? 50 minutes Individual surveys, props, and costumes Students analyze their own and their peers' perceptions of gender roles often associated with sexual relationships between men and women by performing role-play that attempts to break down gender stereotypes.
6. When No Means No 50 minutes Audio tape, props, and costumes Students learn about the prevalence of and attitudes or stereotypes towards acquaintance rape by analyzing a poem and data. Then the students write and perform a role-play in which they recommend prevention strategies for their peers.
7. Culminating Activity 50 minutes Poster paper, marking pens, crayons, or colored pencils Students learn how to make decisions based on varying opinions and advice by assuming the role of an interest group and recommending strategies for students who are dealing with conflicting messages about sex.

GroupWork 1: Teacher Activity Notes - Orientation Activity

Big Idea: Dealing with Conflicting Messages

PLAN

Summary As a class, students analyze decisions made by teenagers about sexually related issues in popular TV shows. After discussing the various perspectives and decisions of the teens, students create their own definition of the term “conflicting messages.”

Group Size 4 to 5 students

Objectives

Students:

  • define the term “conflicting messages.”
  • analyze and demonstrate the decision-making process.
  • explain their own personal values and opinions on sexually related issues.

Student Materials

  • None required

Estimated Time 30-minute period

Multiple Abilities

  • Retelling a situation, explaining clearly and fully, using words precisely (communication skills)
  • Considering multiple perspectives, making connections between ideas/concepts, logically analyzing the problem, applying previous knowledge (reasoning skills)

Suggested Use

  • This set of activities works well at the end of the unit.

IMPLEMENT

  1. This activity is intended to set the stage for the rest of the GroupWork activities in this unit. The TV programs are used because it seems that students often find it easier to express their feeling and/or opinions when it appears that they are talking about someone else.
  2. After the activity you may want to share with your students the common steps for making decisions. You can refer students to Section 8 in the HumBio unit Reproduction and the end of Section 8 in the unit Sexuality.

Assessment

Use the group discussion to assess if students can

  • clarify the problem, generate options or alternatives, decide on a plan of action, and predict the consequences.
  • identify the conflicting messages presented on sexually related issues.
  • explain their own personal values and opinions on sexually related issues.

Extension Questions

  • Some people believe that television and movies have a very strong influence over adolescents and their behavior, and therefore should promote only a safe and positive perspective regarding sex. Do you feel that you and your friends are heavily influenced by the media? Do you think the media has a responsibility to promote positive messages about sex to adolescents?

GroupWork 1 Activity Guide: Orientation Activity (Student Reproducible)

Big Idea: Dealing with Conflicting Messages

Introduction

Someday you'll have to make decisions about whether or not to become sexually active. When you do, you need to carefully consider all of the information that is available, your options, and the consequences of your behavior in order to make an informed decision. You can make a plan of action ahead of time, so you won't have to make a last-minute decision about such an important issue.

Materials

  • None required

Procedure

1. Brainstorm a list of TV shows you have seen recently that involve teenagers. Describe the situations that focused on the topics of sexual relationships, abstinence, birth control, sexually transmitted diseases, or unwanted pregnancy.

2. With your group, discuss the following questions.

  • What was the situation in the TV program?
  • What options were available to the characters in making a decision about sex?
  • What people or things influenced the characters as they tried to decide what to do?
  • What decisions did the characters on the show make about sex?
  • How did the characters arrive at their decision?
  • What were the consequences of the decisions that they made?
  • Does your group agree or disagree with the decisions made by the characters on the show? Why or why not?

3. As a group, identify and list the various messages related to sexual issues with which teenagers are bombarded on TV and in the movies.

  • Who is the source of each of these messages?
  • Why might the source of the messages want to send these messages to teenagers?

4. Based on what you've discussed, create a definition for the phrase “conflicting messages.”

GroupWork 2: Teacher Activity Notes - Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs): Myths or Facts?

Big Idea: Dealing with Conflicting Messages

PLAN

Summary Students learn about STDs by identifying and distinguishing the facts about STDs from commonly held beliefs about STDs.

Group Size 4 to 5 students

Objectives

Students:

  • distinguish between myths and facts about STDs.
  • identify the conflicting messages presented on the topic of STDs.
  • analyze information on STDs with a critical eye.
  • explain their own personal values and opinions on the prevention of STDs.

Student Materials

  • Resource
  • Individual Report
  • Art supplies, props, and costumes

Multiple Abilities

  • Clearly articulating a position, explaining clearly and fully, using words precisely, being persuasive (communication skills)
  • Making connections between ideas/concepts, applying previous knowledge, considering multiple perspectives, logically analyzing the problem (reasoning ability)
  • Creating a role-play, taking the role of another person, expressing emotions, imagining an experience you have never experienced (creative/dramatic ability)

Estimated Time 50-minute period

Suggested Use

  • This set of activities works well at the end of the unit.

IMPLEMENT

  1. It is important for students to read information about STDs, such as Sections 6 and 7 of the unit titled Sexuality. These sections provide valuable background information for students. You may wish to assign the reading as homework, or ask students to read the section in groups during class. Provide these sections as resources during the activity.
  2. You may wish to divide students into single-sex groups for this activity. The material is very sensitive and students may feel more comfortable with members of their own gender.

Assessment

Use the group role play, individual report, and group discussion to assess if students can

  • distinguish between myths and facts about STDs.
  • identify the conflicting messages presented on the topic of STDs.
  • research the sources of material to determine the reliability of the information.
  • analyze information on STDs with a critical eye.
  • explain their own personal values and opinions on the prevention of STDs.

Extension Questions

  • What kind of symptoms might lead a person to suspect that they have an STD?
  • How can a person avoid contracting an STD?

GroupWork 2 Activity Guide: Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs): Myths or Facts? (Student Reproducible)

Big Idea: Dealing with Conflicting Messages

Introduction

Often people don't feel comfortable talking about sex. This is especially true for the topic of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Therefore, the boundary between myths and facts about STDs becomes blurred. A sexually transmitted disease is an infection caused by microorganisms (bacteria or viruses) transmitted through the exchange of bodily fluids, typically through sexual contact. What are the facts about STDs and how can we distinguish the facts from the myths?

Materials

  • Resource
  • Individual Report
  • Art supplies, costumes, props, and written materials about STDs

Procedure

1. How can you tell the difference between a myth and a fact?

2. Analyze the statements about STDs found on the Resource. Using as many sources of information as you can, decide which statements are facts and which are myths. Discuss the following question.

What are myths about STDs?

3. Your team was hired by a popular music video channel to create a TV commercial aimed at a young audience. As a group, create a script for a role-play that dramatizes the conflicting messages relating to the myths and facts about STDs. Be sure to include several examples from your resource materials, and advise the audience on how to deal with these conflicting messages.

4. Present your role-play to the class using costumes and/or creative props.

GroupWork 2 Resource: Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs): Myths or Facts? (Student Reproducible)

Big Idea: Dealing with Conflicting Messages

Using as many sources of information as you can, decide which of the following statements are facts and which are myths (and not true).

  1. “I take birth control pills, so I don't have to worry about STDs.”
  2. “She looks so healthy, I couldn't possibly get AIDS from her.”
  3. “The best way to protect myself against AIDS is not to have sex now at all.”
  4. “I would know it if I had an STD.”
  5. “Since Anna has AIDS, her unborn baby can also get AIDS.”
  6. “I never swim at the community swimming pool because someone there might have AIDS.”
  7. “Although my blisters have disappeared, I will never get rid of herpes.”
  8. “My boyfriend and I practice safe sex-we use the withdrawal method.”
  9. “If it's true love, I won't get STDs.”
  10. “I've only had sex once. I won't get AIDS.”
  11. “My first thought that I might have syphilis is that I have a rash all over my body.”
  12. “It doesn't matter if I get an STD-they're all easily treated by a doctor.”
  13. “I'm too young to get an STD.”
  14. “I know that a condom doesn't guarantee that I won't get AIDS, but it's the best birth control method to protect me besides not having sex at all.”

GroupWork 2 Individual Report: Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs): Myths or Facts? (Student Reproducible)

Big Idea: Dealing with Conflicting Messages

1. What were the different messages and the sources of messages you included in your role-play?

2. What strategies do you recommend for dealing with the conflicting messages?

3. What would you say to someone who said, “I've only had sex with one person, so I know I won't gets AIDS.”?

GroupWork 3: Teacher Activity Notes - To Wait or Not to Wait?

Big Idea: Dealing with Conflicting Messages

PLAN

Summary Students learn about the pros of abstaining from sexual intercourse by analyzing quotes and statistics that show contradictions between what teenagers say and what they actually do.

Group Size 4 to 5 students

Objectives

Students:

  • identify conflicting messages on the topic of abstinence.
  • explain their own personal values and opinions on abstinence.

Student Materials

  • Resources 1 and 2
  • Individual Report
  • Art supplies, props, and costumes

Multiple Abilities

  • Clearly articulating a position, explaining clearly and fully, using words precisely, being persuasive (communication skills)
  • Making connections between ideas/concepts, applying previous knowledge, considering multiple perspectives, logically analyzing the problem (reasoning ability)
  • Creating a role-play, taking the role of another person, expressing emotions, imagining an experience you have never experienced (creative/dramatic ability)
  • Analyzing data, constructing bar graphs, making inferences about the data (calculating ability)

Estimated Time 50-minute period

Suggested Use

  • This set of activities works well at the end of the unit.

IMPLEMENT

  1. It is helpful to have students read information about the choice of abstaining from sexual intercourse, such as Section 6 of the unit titled Reproduction or Sections 4, 7, and 8 of the unit titled Sexuality. You may wish to assign the reading as homework or ask students to read the section in groups during class.
  2. You may wish to divide students into single-sex groups for this activity. The material is very sensitive and students may feel more comfortable with members of their own gender.

Assessment

Use the group role-play, individual report, and group discussion to assess if students can

  • list reasons to abstain from sexual intercourse.
  • analyze and present data in graphical format.
  • identify the conflicting messages on the topic of abstinence.
  • explain their own personal values and opinions on abstinence.

Extension Questions

  • How can you avoid making a rushed decision about whether or not to have a sexual relationship?
  • What are the most common reasons adolescents choose abstinence?

GroupWork 3 Activity Guide: To Wait or Not to Wait? (Student Reproducible)

Big Idea: Dealing with Conflicting Messages

Introduction

There is an overwhelming amount of evidence that shows that abstinence is a healthy decision for a young person. Abstinence means choosing not to have sexual intercourse for the immediate future. Your values and/or personal choice are factors that help you to decide to wait. The decision to abstain from sexual intercourse prevents the risks of an unwanted pregnancy and the transmission of STDs, including AIDS. Why are there so many people who are NOT waiting? How do you deal with these conflicting messages?

Materials

  • Resources 1 and 2
  • Individual Report
  • Art supplies, props, and costumes

Procedure

1. Using the resource materials, create bar graphs to illustrate the rates of pregnancies, venereal diseases, and AIDS.

2. What patterns do you see in the graphs for:

  • teenage pregnancies?
  • venereal diseases?
  • AIDS?

Discuss possible explanations for these patterns.

3. On Resource 2, middle school students gave reasons for being responsible in making decisions about sex. How would you explain the contradiction between what students say and the trends shown in the data?

4. Your brother or sister is seeking your advice about whether or not to have sex. As a group, create a script for a role-play that dramatizes the discussion between two siblings and the conflicting messages related to making this decision. Be sure to include all the viewpoints presented in your resource materials and demonstrate the strategies you would suggest to your sibling for dealing with these conflicting messages.

Present your role-play to the class using costumes and/or creative props.

GroupWork 3 Resource 1: To Wait or Not to Wait? (Student Reproducible)

Big Idea: Dealing with Conflicting Messages

Table 1: Birth Rates from 1983 to 1991 (per 1,000 women)
1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991
10 to 14 years old 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.4 1.4
15 to 19 years old 51.4 50.6 51.0 50.2 50.6 53.0 57.3 59.9 62.1
Table 2: Disease Reported from 1970 to 1992
1970 1980 1985 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992
AIDS N/A N/A 8,249 2,107 31,001 33,722 41,595 43,672 45,472
Table 3: Reported Disease from 1970 to 1992 (per 1,000 people)
1970 1980 1985 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992
Gonorrhea 600 1004 911 781 720 733 690 620 501
Syphilis 91 69 68 87 103 111 134 129 113

Statistics are from Statistical Abstract of the United States 1994, U.S. Department of Commerce, Economic and Statistics Administration, Bureau of the Census, 114th Edition, pages 76 and 138.

GroupWork 3 Resource 2: To Wait or Not to Wait? (Student Reproducible)

Big Idea: Dealing with Conflicting Messages

I want to be responsible in making decisions about sex because . . .

  • “Sex could change your life because if you get your partner pregnant, then she won't be able to go to college, and you'll be paying child support.” (male)
  • “I want to live a long life.” (female)
  • “When I get older I'm planning to go to college and get a lot of money, and I don't want anything to interfere.” (female)
  • “I want to be responsible for my decisions about sex, because if I do the wrong decisions I could get AIDS or something.” (male)
  • “I need to decide when I'm ready to do sex.” (male)
  • “I want to make sure I love the boy and don't catch an STD.” (female)
  • “I don't want to get pregnant or catch any type of disease.” (female)
  • “I don't want to have to deal with a baby.” (male)

Quotes are from students at a middle school in California.

GroupWork 3 Individual Report: To Wait or Not to Wait? (Student Reproducible)

Big Idea: Dealing with Conflicting Messages

1. How would you explain the contradiction between what students say and the trends shown in the data?

2. How can you avoid making a rushed decision about whether or not to have a sexual relationship?

3. How would you complete the following phrase?

I want to be responsible in making decisions about sex because. . .

GroupWork 4: Teacher Activity Notes - Body Image-What Is Attractive?

Big Idea: Dealing with Conflicting Messages

PLAN

Summary Students learn about society's varying perceptions of body image by examining magazines and height/weight charts. They can then determine their personal definition of attractiveness.

Group Size 4 to 5 students

Objectives

Students:

  • define the term attractiveness.
  • identify the conflicting messages relating to the issue of body image.
  • explain their own personal values and opinions on the issue of attractiveness.

Student Materials

  • Resource
  • Individual Report
  • Art supplies, props, and costumes, magazines containing pictures of male and female models

Multiple Abilities

  • Clearly articulating a position, explaining clearly and fully, using words precisely, being persuasive (communication skills)
  • Analyzing visuals, detecting subtle messages, making connections between ideas/concepts, applying previous knowledge, considering multiple perspectives, logically analyzing the problem (reasoning ability)
  • Creating a role-play, taking the role of another person, expressing emotions, imagining an experience you have never experienced (creative/dramatic ability)

Estimated Time 50-minute period

Suggested Use

  • This set of activities works well near the end of the unit.

IMPLEMENT

  1. Have students bring in popular magazines with many pictures of male and female models approximately 2-5 days before the day of the activity.
  2. Have students read Sections 6, 7, and 8 of the unit Your Changing Body. You may wish to assign the reading as homework or ask students to read the section in groups during class time.
  3. You may wish to divide students into single-sex groups for this activity, as the material is very sensitive and students may feel more comfortable with members of their own gender.

Background Information

Sections 6, 7, and 8 of the unit Your Changing Body

Assessment

Use the group role-play, individual report, and group discussion to assess if students can

  • define the term “attractiveness.”
  • identify the conflicting messages relating to the issue of body image.
  • explain their own personal values and opinions on the issue of attractiveness.

Extension Questions

  • In your opinion, why have doctors developed these types of charts?
  • Where do you think the magazine images fit into the chart?

This is a wonderful time to reinforce for students that there are healthy ways to make changes to your appearance through the use of a nutritious diet and exercise.

GroupWork 4 Activity Guide: Body Image-What Is Attractive? (Student Reproducible)

Big Idea: Dealing with Conflicting Messages

Introduction

During adolescence your body is growing and changing. This usually changes your own perception of your body. This is also the time that you become acutely aware of how other people perceive you. We all want to be attractive, but what does it mean to be attractive? In this activity, you determine what it means to you to be attractive.

Materials

  • Resource
  • Individual Report
  • Art supplies, props, and magazines that include pictures of male and female models

Procedure

1. What is “attractiveness”? With your group, brainstorm a list of qualities that defines an attractive male and an attractive female. How did the list for females compare with the list for males?

2. Discuss the following questions with your group.

  • How do the magazine images in the resource materials compare to your group's definition of attractiveness?
  • How do the magazine images compare to an average person as defined by the medical charts?
  • Why have the magazines selected these types of body images? What messages are being sent in these images?

3. Imagine that a good friend is seeking your advice about his or her body image. As a group, create a script for a role-play that dramatizes the conflicting messages related to body image. Be sure to include all the viewpoints presented in your resource materials and demonstrate the strategies you would suggest to your friend for dealing with these conflicting messages.

4. Present your role-play to the class using costumes and/or creative props.

GroupWork 4 Resource: Body Image-What Is Attractive? (Student Reproducible)

Big Idea: Dealing with Conflicting Messages

Height VS. Weight Chart displayed at doctor's offices, fitness clubs

Women's Weight/Height Chart
Height Feet/Inches Small Frame Medium Frame Large Frame
4'10'' 102-111 109-121 118-131
4'11'' 103-113 111-123 120-134
5'0'' 104-115 113-126 122-137
5'1'' 106-118 115-129 125-140
5'2'' 108-121 118-132 128-143
5'3'' 111-124 121-135 131-147
5'4'' 114-127 124-138 134-151
5'5'' 117-130 127-141 137-155
5'6'' 120-133 130-144 140-159
5'7'' 123-136 133-147 143-163
5'8'' 126-139 136-150 146-167
5'9'' 129-142 139-153 149-170
5'10'' 132-145 142-156 152-173
5'11'' 135-148 145-159 155-176
6'0'' 138-151 148-162 158-179
Men's Weight/Height Chart
Height Feet/Inches Small Frame Medium Frame Large Frame
5'2'' 128-134 131-141 138-150
5'3'' 130-136 133-143 140-153
5'4'' 132-138 135-145 142-156
5'5'' 134-140 137-148 144-160
5'6'' 136-142 139-151 146-164
5'7'' 138-145 142-154 149-168
5'8'' 140-148 145-157 152-172
5'9'' 142-151 148-160 155-176
5'10'' 144-154 151-163 158-180
5'11'' 146-157 154-166 161-184
6'0'' 149-160 157-170 164-188
6'1'' 152-164 160-174 168-192
6'2'' 155-168 164-178 162-197
6'3'' 158-172 167-182 176-202
6'4'' 162-176 171-187 181-207

GroupWork 4 Individual Report: Body Image-What Is Attractive? (Student Reproducible)

Big Idea: Dealing with Conflicting Messages

1. Which resource contained the most appealing message for your group? Why?

2. How did the images make you feel about your own body?

3. According to the medical chart, what is your weight range for your specific height and frame?

4. Why do you think some people (girls and guys) go to extreme measures such as eating disorders to attain an ideal body image?

GroupWork 5: Teacher Activity Notes - Who's Responsible?

Big Idea: Dealing with Conflicting Messages

PLAN

Summary Students analyze their own and their peers' perceptions of gender roles that are often associated with sexual relationships between men and women by performing a role-play that attempts to break down gender stereotypes.

Group Size 4 to 5 students

Objectives

Students:

  • describe stereotypes about gender roles that may exist in their peer group and/or society.
  • identify the conflicting messages on the topic of gender roles.
  • explain the need for equality between males and females in all steps of a relationship, from dating, to issues of intimacy, sex, and birth control, to parenting.

Student Materials

  • Data Sheet
  • Individual Report
  • Props, costumes

Multiple Abilities

  • Clearly articulating a position, using words precisely, explaining clearly and fully (communication skills)
  • Making connections between ideas/concepts, analyzing data, considering multiple perspectives (reasoning ability)
  • Creating a role-play, expressing emotion, assuming the role of another person (creative/dramatic ability)

Estimated Time 50-minute period

Suggested Use

  • This set of activities works well near the end of the unit.

IMPLEMENT

  1. It would be helpful to have the following sections from the text available to students during this activity. You may also wish to assign Section 2: Dating and Romantic Feelings, Section 4: Adolescent Sexual Behavior, and Section 5: Sexual Abuse and Coercion in the unit Sexuality, as well as Section 3: Pregnancy and Childbirth in the unit Reproduction as reading for homework before completing this activity.
  2. Keep students' surveys as each group completes this activity, so that students can analyze and compare the responses of girls and boys once there are enough surveys to see trends.

Assessment

Use the group role-play, individual report, and group discussion to assess if students can

  • describe stereotypes about gender roles that may exist in their peer group and/or society.
  • identify the conflicting messages on the topic of gender roles.
  • explain the need for equality between males and females in all steps of a relationship, from dating, to issues of intimacy, sex, and birth control, to parenting.

Extension Questions

  • What is one gender stereotype in your group that was counteracted by completing this activity?
  • Students could give the survey to other students at school and their parents, comparing their results and analyzing variables in their subjects such as gender, age, or year in school.

GroupWork 5 Activity Guide: Who's Responsible? (Student Reproducible)

Big Idea: Dealing with Conflicting Messages

Introduction

Across cultures and throughout history, there has been a wide variation in the way people think about the roles of men and women in romance, reproduction, and parenting. We develop ideas about what men and women are supposed to do, depending on the messages we get from society, our parents, our friends, and each other. In this activity you identify and break down some of the common messages/attitudes/stereotypes held by men and women about who is responsible for issues surrounding sex.

Materials

  • Individual Report
  • Props, costumes

Procedure

1. Each person in the group should fill out the Individual Survey on “Who's Responsible?” without discussing it.

2. After all group members have finished their surveys, compare your survey answers using the following guidelines.

  • In what ways were your answers similar to one another? In what ways were they different? Was there a difference between male and female responses?
  • Why did each of you answer the way you did? What experiences or people in your life influenced your answers to the survey?
  • What would you like members of the opposite sex to know about who's responsible for these issues? This is your chance to educate each other!

3. As a group, choose one of the issues from the “Individual Survey on Who's Responsible?” Create a script for a role-play that dramatizes and breaks down the stereotypes or misperceptions that men and women might have about that issue. Be sure to include all the viewpoints presented in your resource materials. Make sure you consider realistic situations and provide/demonstrate strategies on how men and women can share responsibility for issues surrounding dating, sex, and parenting.

Image Attributions

Description

Authors:

Grades:

6 , 7 , 8

Date Created:

Feb 23, 2012

Last Modified:

Apr 29, 2014
You can only attach files to None which belong to you
If you would like to associate files with this None, please make a copy first.

Reviews

Please wait...
Please wait...
Image Detail
Sizes: Medium | Original
 
CK.SCI.ENG.TE.1.Human-Biology-Sexuality.11.1

Original text