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Activity 5-1: Sexual Harassment

PLAN

Summary In this activity students have an opportunity to write about and discuss sexual harassment.

Objectives

Students:

\checkmark recognize and describe sexual harassment.

\checkmark develop strategies to deal with this form of harassment.

Student Materials

  • Activity Report

Teacher Materials

  • Activity Report Answer Key

Advance Preparation

None required

Estimated Time 50 minutes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Social Studies Have students collect news articles dealing with sexual harassment. Have them consider the original questions in this activity as they read the articles. Use these articles as discussion prompts or as prompts for written and/or oral reports.

Have students observe student behavior on the school campus for one day, noting any examples of sexual harassment. Students can relate these observations to the class. The class might develop an observation form that they could fill in during an official observation of student behavior on campus. Using this information, the class can formulate a pro-action plan designed to raise student awareness of what sexual harassment is, its impact on both perpetrators and victims, and possible solutions.

Guidance Have students write a pledge based on the idea, “I will not be a perpetrator and I will not be a victim,” and have them say it daily.

Prerequisites and Background Information

Student knowledge of the different types of sexual harassment

IMPLEMENT

Introduce Activity 5-1 by going over the introduction in the student text.

Steps 1-6 Tell students that they will be writing about an example of sexual harassment that they have witnessed or experienced. The description should include answers to the questions in their text. If any student does not want their paper read to the class, they should mark an X at the top of the paper, so the paper will not be read aloud. Give them 10-20 minutes to write.

Have students pass their papers in. Quickly scan the papers looking for one that obviously was written in some detail. Look for the following features.

a. The example cited is clearly sexual harassment.

b. The example can be appropriately shared with the class.

c. The reactions of the victim and any witnesses are cited.

This review requires quick editing and censuring as needed. The paper might have to be paraphrased, depending on the language.

Read the example and the reactions of victim and witnesses to the class. Ask students the following questions about the example given.

a. Is this a case of sexual harassment? Why?

b. Was the reaction of the victim appropriate to the situation? Why?

c. Was the reaction(s) of any witnesses appropriate? Why?

Read the writer's view as to the motivation of the perpetrator.

a. What could be the motivation of the perpetrator(s)?

b. How would knowing the possible motivation of a perpetrator help one deal with sexual harassment?

Conclude Activity 5-1 by asking students to list on the board possible solutions to this problem.

ASSESS

Use the papers, the written responses on the Activity Report, and the discussion of sexual harassment to assess if students can

\checkmark explain what sexual harassment is.

\checkmark identify ways to stop sexual harassment.

Activity 5-1: Sexual Harassment – Activity Report Answer Key

  • Sample answers to these questions will be provided upon request. Please send an email to teachers-requests@ck12.org to request sample answers.
  1. Describe one example of sexual harassment that you have observed or been subject to in your school or in your community.
  2. Why do you think the perpetrators were sexually harassing the person?
  3. What was the reaction of the victim? How was this person dealing with it?
  4. If there were witnesses to this harassment, what were their reactions?
  5. How should a victim behave under these circumstances?
  6. What can you, as a person or as a group, do to help stop such behavior?

What Do You Think?

Much of discipline involves getting a child to listen to, respond to, and respect adults. Yet in some situations, a child needs to say no. How do children know when it's okay to say no to an adult? How can parents teach children to listen and cooperate, but also to say no when appropriate?

  • A suggested response will be provided upon request. Please send an email to teachers-requests@ck12.org.

Think back to the last section, what are verbal threats and psychological pressure called?

Help Is Available Students create a list of resources for abused children.

What Do You Think?

How old were you when you first heard about rape? What did you think it was? How did knowing about it make you feel?

  • A suggested response will be provided upon request. Please send an email to teachers-requests@ck12.org.

1. Why might a person who has been raped not report it to the police?

2. Why should a person who has been raped report it to the police?

Be Prepared Students identify three resources available to them in case of a sexual assault emergency.

Activity 5-2: What Does “Stop” Mean?

PLAN

Summary In this activity students explore the issue of rape. They consider these questions:

  • What is informed consent?
  • When does “necking” become rape?
  • What strategies can be used to avoid rape?
  • What does “Stop” mean?

Objectives

Students:

\checkmark distinguish between the terms informed consent, rape, and date rape.

\checkmark identify ways to make sure that NO is understood.

Student Materials

  • Resource
  • Activity Report

Teacher Materials

  • Activity Report Answer Key

Advance Preparation

None required

Estimated Time 40 minutes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Social Studies Have students research the laws related to rape and the penalties for rape.

  • Have the class conduct a mock trial of Brad who has been charged with the rape of Laura. What arguments would the prosecution present and what arguments would the defense present? It would be interesting to note if the victim is on trial, as well as the defendant. Are different views held by the different genders in the class, and how does this reflect on the justice system when the victims feel they are the ones who are being persecuted?

Community Service Have students create a school campaign to prevent rape through education: posters, video docu-dramas, radio and television sound bites, letters to students, parents, and school board members, create a speakers bureau.

Language Arts Have students investigate cases of rape in the news. Have them select a real-life situation from the news to write about. Many of the discussion questions students have just considered can be asked of this real-life scenario as well.

  • Have students write a creative script about rape. They can start with the single words listed on the board at the end of this activity. For emphasis, intermix the word “rape” with every third word or fourth word. The script could include three or four sets. A set would consist of five to six words. Example of one set:

Rape

Humiliation

Pain

Rage

Rape

Prerequisites and Background Information

Review the meaning of informed consent. (Informed consent is an agreement based upon an understanding of the situation or activities, and the ability to have free choice.)

IMPLEMENT

Introduce Activity 5-2 by asking students to think of a time when a joke went too far, or when something that was fun stopped being fun because another person got carried away. How did they make the person stop? Rape is a much more serious action. Sometimes the victim cannot prevent the rape. Other times there are situations we can avoid, or responses we can have to situations that may stop a rape from happening.

Step 1 Divide the class into groups of approximately 4-5 students each, and give each student an Activity Report.

Step 2 Allow sufficient time for students to read the scenario and the discussion questions. Ask students if they need any question clarified and, if so, paraphrase the question. Groups should discuss each of the questions and then share their conclusions with the whole class.

Step 3 During the class, review the main points made by each group on the chalkboard. Before leaving question 1, ask the class if any individual has another point of view that has not already been raised. New insights might result when people consider the conclusions listed on the board. Then go to question 2, following the same process for this and the remaining questions.

Conclude Activity 5-2 by asking students to restate the difference between informed consent and rape.

ASSESS

Use group and class discussions to assess if students can:

\checkmark explain the concept of informed consent and what the word “stop” means.

\checkmark define necking.

\checkmark describe prevention strategies.

\checkmark explain rape and identify rape as a crime.

Activity Report 5-2: What Does “Stop” Mean? – Activity Report Answer Key

Discussion Questions

  1. Look at Laura's interactions throughout the evening.
    • Does she give informed consent at any time during the evening? Explain.
    • Does she definitely not give informed consent at any time during the evening?
    • Give examples and explain.
  2. What explanation can be given for Brad's behavior?
    • Is he a perpetrator of rape or date rape? Explain.
    • Could any of Laura's actions have given Brad the mistaken impression that he could take advantage of the situation?
    • What should Laura, the college, law, and society do about Brad?
  3. What was it that Laura did or did not do that made it more likely that something like this would happen to her? Explain through specific examples.
  4. What did Laura mean by “stop”? Do girls say one thing and boys hear another thing? Explain.
  5. List five to eight single words that best express the emotions Laura must have felt after the rape.

  • You are a peer counselor at school, and you recently spent a lot of time with a student who keeps saying yes to people in a variety of situations when she really means no. You are beginning to worry about whether she is going to get sexually involved with someone against her will, just because she is afraid to say no. What is your advice to her? How might you help her develop some confidence and skills to say no?
  • You have recently discovered that one of your friends has been sexually abused by a family friend. What should you do? Write an entry in your diary about your reactions to the situation and what you plan to say and do to help your friend?

Review Questions-Answers

  • Sample answers to these questions will be provided upon request. Please send an email to teachers-requests@ck12.org to request sample answers.
  1. What is sexual exploitation? Provide and explain an example.
  2. What is sexual abuse by relatives called?
  3. What are some common feelings felt by a child being abused, and what factors affect how well a child will handle and recover from abusive situations?
  4. Give some examples of psychological coercion.
  5. What is the difference between rape and statutory rape?
  6. What does informed consent mean? Why is it important?
  7. List five safety tips for preventing rape.

Activity 5-1 Report: Sexual Harassment (Student Reproducible)

1. Describe one example of sexual harassment that you have observed or been subject to in your school or in your community.

2. Why do you think the perpetrators were sexually harassing this person?

3. What was the reaction of the victim? How was this person dealing with it?

4. If there were witnesses to this harassment, what were their reactions?

5. How should a victim behave under these circumstances?

6. What can you, as a person or as a group, do to help stop such behavior?

Activity 5-2 Resource: What Does “Stop” Mean? (Student Reproducible)

Instructions

Read this scenario and respond to the accompanying questions, The discussion questions should be discussed in each group and then discussed by the class as a whole.

Scenario

Laura is a first-year student in college, She goes to an unsupervised party at a dorm with Mary, who knows some of the guys, For several hours, they drink beer, talk, and listen to music. Occasionally Laura playfully hugs or kisses some of the boys. Then the party starts getting rowdy, Some of the guys, who are quite drunk by then, begin to grab Laura. At first they grab her playfully and then more roughly, Laura tries to stop them but they don't pay any attention. Her head is reeling from the beer. She doesn't know what to do. Then Brad, one of the young men she had been talking to earlier, walks over and pulls her away from the others. She is quite relieved. She starts looking for Mary so they can go home, but Mary is nowhere in sight.

Brad suggests that they go up to his room, where she won't be bothered. He tells her that she can wait there for Mary. Laura isn't so sure that's a good idea. But Brad seems like a nice guy. She thinks, “After all, he did rescue me.” Besides, it is very late, and she doesn't like the idea of walking back to her dorm in the dark alone. Laura decides to accept his offer.

Once in the room, Brad and Laura drink some more beers. Soon, Brad is making passes at Laura. At first she goes along with it. Then, when he starts to undress her, Laura asks him to please stop. She says it gently, so she won't hurt his feelings or make him angry. Then Brad becomes a different person. He drops all pretense at being nice. He pushes her onto his bed. Despite her loud cries to stop, he rapes her.

Activity 5-2 Report: What Does “Stop” Mean? (Student Reproducible)

Discussion Questions

1. Look at Laura's interactions throughout the evening.

  • Does she give informed consent at any time during the evening? Explain.
  • Does she definitely not give informed consent at any time during the evening?
  • Give examples and explain.

2. What explanation can be given for Brad's behavior?

  • Is he a perpetrator of rape or date rape? Explain.
  • Could any of Laura's actions have given Brad the mistaken impression that he could take advantage of the situation?
  • What should Laura, the college, law, and society do about Brad?

3. What was it that Laura did or did not do that made it more-likely that something like this would happen to her? Explain through specific examples.

4. What did Laura mean by “stop”? Do girls say one thing and boys hear another thing? Explain.

5. List five to eight single words that best express the emotions Laura must have felt after the rape.

Image Attributions

Description

Authors:

Grades:

6 , 7 , 8

Date Created:

Feb 23, 2012

Last Modified:

Apr 29, 2014
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CK.SCI.ENG.TE.1.Human-Biology-Sexuality.6.3

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