<meta http-equiv="refresh" content="1; url=/nojavascript/"> Activities and Answer Keys | CK-12 Foundation
Dismiss
Skip Navigation
You are reading an older version of this FlexBook® textbook: Human Biology Your Changing Body Teacher's Guide Go to the latest version.

Activity 6-1: Gender Differences

PLAN

Summary Students identify their favorite activities and interests, then survey the class to see if some activities are primarily of interest to the boys, while others are primarily of interest to the girls. Through discussion, they determine some of the reasons that these differences in interest occur between boys and girls.

Objectives

Students:

\checkmark share interests.

\checkmark look for gender differences and similarities.

\checkmark analyze the reasons for the differences.

Student Materials

  • Activity Report

Teacher Materials

  • None required

Advance Preparation

Question 9 requires students to demonstrate activities that they have prepared. You will need to determine ahead of time how elaborate you want their presentations to be and plan accordingly. It is also possible to eliminate question 9 and simply end with the discussion.

Estimated Time 30 minutes for the Activity Report and discussion portion of the activity

Question 9 will need to be assigned and planned on one day (10-15 minutes) and done the next day, or several days later. The time will vary greatly depending on the type of presentations.

Interdisciplinary Connections

Math Using the information gathered in the activity, have students create a bar graph which compares how many boys and how many girls like each activity. Alternatively, have students calculate what percentage of the boys and what percentage of the girls participate in each activity.

Prerequisites and Background Information

None required

IMPLEMENT

Introduce Activity 6-1 by discussing some favorite things you and the class enjoy.

Steps 1-2 Have students think quietly about their favorite things that they do for fun. Give them two minutes. Distribute the Activity Report, and review the Procedure.

Steps 3-4 When they have identified their favorite activities have them share their answers and add activities to a master list. You may want to create an overhead transparency to which you can add activities.

Steps 5-8 Have the class vote on which activities they enjoy the most. Record the votes by boys and girls. Look for preferences by sex. Have them discuss questions 6-8 in their text. Focus on where and how they learned the activity, and why they enjoy it.

Step 9 Group the class by sex. If the class is large, you may need two groups of boys and two groups of girls. Each group will plan to teach an activity to a group of the opposite sex. They should select an activity that they really enjoy, but that they think the opposite sex doesn't do very often. For example, string games are often played by girls, but not by boys. You will have to set your own restrictions on how much time you want the activity to take, and how much time you want to give the groups to prepare.

Conclude Activity 6-1 by having the students present their activities to each other. Discuss their reactions.

ASSESS

Use the Activity Report responses and the class discussion to assess if students can:

\checkmark share interests.

\checkmark identify gender differences and similarities.

\checkmark analyze the reasons for the differences.

Debate! Students debate the sentence, “If women can choose to stay at home to raise the kids or develop a career, a man should have the same choice.”

What Do You Think?

Why is it that girls are now raised to be anything they want-from housewives to presidents-yet most boys are raised to develop some career? Why are men, but not women, subject to the military draft? Think about other examples of differences in roles and expectations for men and women. Are they set by “nature,” or by “culture”? Do you agree or disagree with the examples you find?

Who Says So? Students name three sources of information about how they are supposed to behave, besides their family, friends, or peer group, and rank them according to how much these sources influence them.

What Do You Think? Think of a situation in which you “flew off the handle.” How has an act of emotionality or aggressiveness hurt those around you unnecessarily? What could you say or do to improve the situation or repair the damage?

What Do You Think?

If in America aggression is largely culturally linked, should we as a society try to change our parenting styles? What positive side of aggression might we want to still keep?

It's Never Too Late Students write or call someone to whom they owe an apology.

Activity 6-2: Behavior Differences

PLAN

Summary Students look at their own behavior, then compare it to the behavior of other members of their sex. They also look at the behavior of the opposite sex and see if they can make any generalizations. Through discussion they try to identify the reasons for the differences they see and develop a list of behaviors that they would like to see all people follow, regardless of sex.

Objectives

Students:

\checkmark discuss perceived gender behavior differences.

\checkmark analyze the reasons for the differences.

\checkmark develop a list of positive behaviors that apply to both sexes.

Student Materials

  • Activity Report

Teacher Materials

  • Activity Report Answer Key

Advance Preparation

None required

Estimated Time 30-40 minutes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Art Turn the list called Ways That Human Beings Should Behave into an illustrated wall chart, post it, and use it as a set of class standards of behavior.

Language Arts Ask students to talk with their parents about the way that opportunities and expectations have changed for the sexes since the parents or guardians were children. Was there anything that their parents or guardians would have liked to do, but couldn't because of restrictions or perceptions? Are there any behaviors that they know they have developed because it was expected of them as a man or a woman? What do they hope will be different for their children? Students should report what they learned from their discussions.

Prerequisites and Background Information

None required

IMPLEMENT

Introduce Activity 6-2 by reinforcing the idea that they are to focus on actions and behaviors in this activity.

Step 1 Review the Procedure. Distribute the Activity Reports and ask students to write their individual answers to the first question. Allow them about 5 minutes.

Steps 2-3 Divide the class into same sex groups. The size of the groups will depend on the nature of the class, and how many groups you want to have report back to the class. Tell them to describe what they consider to be general boy behaviors, and what they consider to be general girl behaviors. Remind them that the behavior doesn't have to be true of everyone in the group for it to be put on the list. It just has to be representative of a large number. Remind them to describe behaviors in a neutral way, rather than judging the behaviors. Ask each group to select a discussion leader and a recorder to record their list, or write a paragraph, then walk around the classroom as they conduct their discussions. This should take about 10 minutes, but you may want to give them more time if their discussions seem to be going well.

Steps 4-5 When groups have finished their discussions, ask them to choose a spokesperson. Reconvene the class and have the groups take turns comparing their findings. Let the boys respond to what the girls say about them, and let the girls respond to what the boys say about them. Remind them again that the descriptions are of groups, not of individuals, and that the descriptions should be neutral rather than judgmental. Next, conduct a class discussion of question 5 on the Activity Report.

Step 6 As a final activity, divide the class into mixed sex groups of 4-8 students and have them complete the section on the Activity Report titled Ways That Human Beings Should Behave.

Conclude Activity 6-2 by sharing the final lists in a whole-class discussion. You may want to combine the answers into a single class list.

ASSESS

Use the Activity Report and discussions to assess if students can

\checkmark discuss perceived gender behavior differences.

\checkmark analyze the reasons for the differences.

\checkmark develop a list of positive behaviors that apply to both sexes.

Activity 6-2: Behavior Differences – Activity Report Answer Key

  • Sample answers to these questions will be provided upon request. Please send an email to teachers-requests@ck12.org to request sample answers.
How Do I Behave?
How Do Boys Behave?
How Do Girls Behave?
Ways That Human Beings Should Behave

A suggested response will be provided upon request. Please send an email to teachers-requests@ck12.org.

What are some ways teenagers can control aggressiveness? If aggressive behavior is directed at you, what are some ways you can deal with it?

What Do You Think?

Sometimes when boys act aggressively, it is excused with the expression, “Boys will be boys.” Based on what you are learning, how do you feel about this statement?

What Do You Think?

  • What makes change stressful? How does anticipated change (going to high school) differ from unanticipated change (getting sick)?
  • How do biological changes (puberty, aging) differ from social changes (moving and making new friends, getting fired, financial success)?

Changes Happen Around You, Too Students identify changes taking place around them.

Activity 6-3: Who Me-Worry?

PLAN

Summary Students think about the changes of puberty that worry them the most and try to predict what worries others. They then compare answers, reach consensus on common concerns, and offer suggestions to each other on how to cope with the many changes of puberty.

Objectives

Students:

\checkmark identify the physical, emotional, and social changes of puberty.

\checkmark compare concerns.

Student Materials

  • Activity Report

Teacher Materials

  • Activity Report Answer Key

Advance Preparation

None required

Estimated Time 40 minutes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Language Arts Have students use the ideas generated to write a “Dear Abby” type of column in which they create sample letters about worries during puberty, and then generate answers about how to cope with each problem. Each student could address a different concern, and then all answers could be compiled in a single “advice column.”

Prerequisites and Background Information

None required

IMPLEMENT

Introduce Activity 6-3 by explaining that the class will have an opportunity to share concerns about all the changes that are happening to them physically, emotionally, and socially. Review the Procedure. Remind students about the proper way to talk about sensitive material. They are to listen attentively and respectively. They should respond positively when possible, and express differing views calmly, without resorting to insults or put-downs.

Step 1 Distribute the Activity Reports and ask students to write their individual answers. Allow them about 5 minutes.

Step 2 Divide the class into groups. These can be same-sex groups or mixed groups, depending on your preference. The size of the groups will depend on the nature of the class, and how many groups you want to have report back to the class. Give each group about 8 minutes to compare answers, add to their own lists, and come up with new ideas. Encourage groups to develop 12 or so ideas.

Step 3 Ask each group to select a spokesperson. Ask each spokesperson to share one idea at a time from each category with the class. Continue sharing ideas until all ideas have been reported. Then ask the class to add any remaining concerns they can think of.

Step 4 Ask everyone to silently choose the three items that worry them the most. As a class, vote on what the three most common concerns in each category are.

Step 5 Conduct a class discussion to let students share ideas on how to cope with these problems. If you Wish, show the class the suggested responses for the Activity Report, which were compiled by students in South Oldham, Kentucky. Compare it to your class list. Talk about how most of the worries about puberty are universal.

Conclude Activity 6-3 by having the students complete

Step 6. Give them 5 quiet minutes to write a paragraph on the back of their Activity Report or in their journal about what worries them the most, and how they intend to cope with that worry.

ASSESS

Use the individual responses on the Activity Report, the group interaction, and the whole-class discussions to assess if students can

\checkmark identify the physical, emotional, and social changes of puberty.

\checkmark compare concerns.

\checkmark demonstrate their sensitivity to the concerns of others.

Activity 6-3: Who Me-Worry? – Activity Report Answer Key

  • Sample answers to these questions will be provided upon request. Please send an email to teachers-requests@ck12.org to request sample answers.

(Compiled by 7th Grade Students, South Oldham, KY)

Things both girls and boys worry about during puberty Things girls (but not boys) worry about during puberty Things boys (but not girls) worry about during puberty

What Do You Think?

What are some strategies for dealing with life's stresses? How do you handle being different? How can you help someone else? How can you develop confidence in your own strengths and interests-especially if they aren't like everyone else's?

What Do You Think

  • Who has the harder adjustment when off-time-girls or boys?
  • What advantages do you feel you have at this age?
  • Why do you choose the friends you do? Why is it important to be with people like you? Different from you?

How much do you feel that the fact that you are a girl or a boy influences the way that you think, the way that you feel, the way you behave, the things that you do, the opportunities you are given, and the way that others think about you? In your opinion, how much of this is because you were born a boy or a girl, and how much is because of the culture around you?

Review Questions/Answers

  • Sample answers to these questions will be provided upon request. Please send an email to teachers-requests@ck12.org to request sample answers.
  1. What is the difference between gender and sex when describing males and females?
  2. What is the difference between gender identity and gender role?
  3. To what should we attribute the gender differences in aggression and emotional expression? Explain.
  4. How does the term adaptation apply to puberty and adolescence?
  5. What are three consequences of being off-schedule for early maturers? Late maturers?
  6. What are three sources of stress for adolescents?

Activity 6-1 Report: Gender Differences (Student Reproducible)

Refer to p. 00 in your text for the instructions to this activity.

Interests and Activities Boys Girls
1. television
2. talking with friends on the phone
3. going to a friend's house
4. hanging out somewhere
5. shopping
6. electronic games
7. computers
8. make something or build something
9. go for a walk or be alone
10. cook
11. take lessons
12. shoot baskets
13. play a team sport such as:
14. collect something such as:
15. play a board game or cards
16. help someone
17. read a book or magazine
18. trade secrets with a friend
19. have a party
20. go to an arcade
21. play with animals
22. see a movie
23. art:
24. music:
25. dance:
26.
27.

Activity 6-2 Report: Behavior Differences (Student Reproducible)

Think about the following questions, first as they apply to you as an individual, then as they apply to boys in general, then as they apply to girls in general.

How do you interact with your same-sex peers? How do you behave near members of the opposite sex? How do you relate to adults? How do you behave at school? How do you behave in a crowd? How do you behave with strangers? How do you react when you are angry? How do you react when you are sad? How do you react when you are lonely? How do you react when you are hurt? What about disappointed, scared, worried, proud, happy, confused, and bored? How do you react when you are being teased? How do you respond to others when they are feeling any of the ways just mentioned? How aware are you of how others are feeling? How do you handle problems that require physical strength or difficulty? How do you handle situations that require thinking and planning? How do you let others know how you feel? How do you make friends? How do you act when playing a game? How do you act when you win or lose?

How Do I Behave?
How Do Boys Behave?
How Do Girls Behave?
Ways That Human Beings Should Behave

Activity 6-3 Report: Who Me-Worry? (Student Reproducible)

Things both girls and boys worry about during puberty Things girls (but not boys) worry about during puberty Things boys (but not girls) worry about during puberty
1. 1. 1.
2. 2. 2.
3. 3. 3.
4. 4. 4.
5. 5. 5.
6. 6. 6.
7. 7. 7.
8. 8. 8.
9. 9. 9.
10. 10. 10.
11. 11. 11.
12. 12. 12.
13. 13. 13.
14. 14. 14.
15. 15. 15.
16. 16. 16.
17. 17. 17.
18. 18. 18.

Image Attributions

Description

Authors:

Grades:

6 , 7 , 8

Date Created:

Feb 23, 2012

Last Modified:

Apr 29, 2014
You can only attach files to None which belong to you
If you would like to associate files with this None, please make a copy first.

Reviews

Please wait...
Please wait...
Image Detail
Sizes: Medium | Original
 
CK.SCI.ENG.TE.1.Human-Biology-Your-Changing-Body.7.3

Original text