<img src="https://d5nxst8fruw4z.cloudfront.net/atrk.gif?account=iA1Pi1a8Dy00ym" style="display:none" height="1" width="1" alt="" />
Dismiss
Skip Navigation

Conversion between Degrees and Radians

Convert between radians and degrees

Atoms Practice
Estimated16 minsto complete
%
Progress
Practice Conversion between Degrees and Radians
 
 
 
MEMORY METER
This indicates how strong in your memory this concept is
Practice
Progress
Estimated16 minsto complete
%
Practice Now
Turn In
Introduction to the Unit Circle and Radian Measure

An oddly-shaped house in Asia is built at a 135 angle. How many radians is this angle equal to?

Unit Circle and Radian Measure

The unit circle is the circle centered at the origin with radius equal to one unit. This means that the distance from the origin to any point on the circle is equal to one unit.

Using the unit circle, we can define another unit of measure for angles, radians. Radian measure is based upon the circumference of the unit circle. The circumference of the unit circle is 2π (2πr, where r=1). So a full revolution, or 360, is equal to 2π radians. Half a rotation, or 180 is equal to π radians.

One radian is equal to the measure of θ, the rotation required for the arc length intercepted by the angle to be equal to the radius of the circle. In other words the arc length is 1 unit for θ=1 radian.

We can use the equality, π=180 to convert from degrees to radians and vice versa.

To convert from degrees to radians, multiply by π180.

To convert from radians to degrees, multiply by 180π.

Let's convert the following units of measure.

  1. Convert 250 to radians.

To convert from degrees to radians, multiply by π180. So, 250π180=25π18.

  1. Convert 3π to degrees.

To convert from radians to degrees, multiply by 180π. So, 3π×180π=3×180=540.

Now, let's find two angles, one positive and one negative, coterminal to 5π3 and find its reference angle, in radians.

Since we are working in radians now we will add/subtract multiple of 2π instead of 360. Before we can add, we must get a common denominator of 3 as shown below.

5π3+2π=5π3+6π3=11π3and5π32π=5π36π3=π3

Now, to find the reference angle, first determine in which quadrant 5π3 lies. If we think of the measures of the angles on the axes in terms of π and more specifically, in terms of π3, this task becomes a little easier.

Consider π is equal to 3π3 and 2π is equal to 6π3 as shown in the diagram. Now we can see that the terminal side of 5π3 lies in the fourth quadrant and thus the reference angle will be:

6π35π3=π3

Finally, let's find two angles coterminal to 7π6, one positive and one negative, and find its reference angle, in radians.

This time we will add multiples of 2π with a common denominator of 6, or 2π1×66=12π6. For the positive angle, we add to get 7π6+12π6=19π6. For the negative angle, we subtract to get 7π612π6=5π6.

In this case π is equal to 6π6 and 2π is equal to 12π6 as shown in the diagram. Now we can see that the terminal side of 7π6 lies in the third quadrant and thus the reference angle will be:

7π66π6=π6

Examples

Example 1

Earlier, you were asked to convert 135 to radians.

To convert from degrees to radians, multiply by π180. So, 135π180=3π4.

Convert the following angle measures from degrees to radians.

Example 2

45

45×π180=π4

Example 3

120

120×π180=2π3

Example 4

\begin{align*}330^\circ\end{align*}

\begin{align*}330^\circ \times \frac{\pi}{180^\circ}=\frac{11 \pi}{6}\end{align*}

Convert the following angle measures from radians to degrees.

Example 5

\begin{align*}\frac{5 \pi}{6}\end{align*}

\begin{align*}\frac{5 \pi}{6} \times \frac{180^\circ}{\pi}=150^\circ\end{align*}

Example 6

\begin{align*}\frac{13 \pi}{4}\end{align*}

\begin{align*}\frac{13 \pi}{4} \times \frac{180^\circ}{\pi}=585^\circ\end{align*}

Example 7

 \begin{align*}-\frac{5 \pi}{2}\end{align*}

\begin{align*}-\frac{5 \pi}{2} \times \frac{180^\circ}{\pi}=-450^\circ\end{align*}

Example 8

Find two coterminal angles to \begin{align*}\frac{11 \pi}{4}\end{align*}, one positive and one negative, and its reference angle.

There are many possible coterminal angles, here are some possibilities:

positive coterminal angle: \begin{align*}\frac{11 \pi}{4} + \frac{8 \pi}{4} = \frac{19 \pi}{4}\end{align*} or \begin{align*}\frac{11 \pi}{4} - \frac{8 \pi}{4} = \frac{3 \pi}{4}\end{align*},

negative coterminal angle: \begin{align*}\frac{11 \pi}{4} - \frac{16 \pi}{4} = -\frac{5 \pi}{4}\end{align*} or \begin{align*}\frac{11 \pi}{4} - \frac{24 \pi}{4} = -\frac{13 \pi}{4}\end{align*}

Using the coterminal angle, \begin{align*}\frac{3 \pi}{4}\end{align*}, which is \begin{align*}\frac{\pi}{4}\end{align*} from \begin{align*}\frac{4 \pi}{4}\end{align*}. So the terminal side lies in the second quadrant and the reference angle is \begin{align*}\frac{\pi}{4}\end{align*}.

Review

For problems 1-5, convert the angle from degrees to radians. Leave answers in terms of \begin{align*}\pi\end{align*}.

  1. \begin{align*}135^\circ\end{align*}
  2. \begin{align*}240^\circ\end{align*}
  3. \begin{align*}-330^\circ\end{align*}
  4. \begin{align*}450^\circ\end{align*}
  5. \begin{align*}-315^\circ\end{align*}

For problems 6-10, convert the angle measure from radians to degrees.

  1. \begin{align*}\frac{7 \pi}{3}\end{align*}
  2. \begin{align*}-\frac{13 \pi}{6}\end{align*}
  3. \begin{align*}\frac{9 \pi}{2}\end{align*}
  4. \begin{align*}-\frac{3 \pi}{4}\end{align*}
  5. \begin{align*}\frac{5 \pi}{6}\end{align*}

For problems 11-15, find two coterminal angles (one positive, one negative) and the reference angle for each angle in radians.

  1. \begin{align*}\frac{8 \pi}{3}\end{align*}
  2. \begin{align*}\frac{11 \pi}{4}\end{align*}
  3. \begin{align*}-\frac{\pi}{6}\end{align*}
  4. \begin{align*}\frac{4 \pi}{3}\end{align*}
  5. \begin{align*}-\frac{17 \pi}{6}\end{align*}

Answers for Review Problems

To see the Review answers, open this PDF file and look for section 13.6. 

Notes/Highlights Having trouble? Report an issue.

Color Highlighted Text Notes
Please to create your own Highlights / Notes
Show More

Vocabulary

TermDefinition
subtended arc A subtended arc is the part of the circle in between the two rays that make the central angle.

Image Attributions

Explore More

Sign in to explore more, including practice questions and solutions for Conversion between Degrees and Radians.
Please wait...
Please wait...